Morning Edition

Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories.

Sharp Ears with Constance Fee

Your Sharp Ears guide to listening is Constance Fee, the Vocal Program Director, Artist-in-Residence, and Associate Professor of Vocal Performance at Roberts Wesleyan College. 


Sharp Ears with Christopher Wilke

In the Sharp Ears series, Rochester’s top musicians guide you to the artists, composers, and recordings most worth your time.  Your Sharp Ears guide to listening is lutenist Chris Wilke.

Sharp Ears with Christine Goerke

In this series from WXXI, musicians offer access to their inner lives as listeners.  Enjoy a short conversation with leading dramatic soprano Christine Goerke, who earned high praise for her starring role in the opera Ariadne  in Naxos this summer at the Glimmerglass Festival in Cooperstown. 


New Ways of Learning Music at Hochstein's Music Lab

Learning music is about more than playing the instrument or singing – students of all levels also often learn a little bit about music history and theory to round out their education.

Non-complacencies of the peignoir

At least once a day someone asks me, “What time DO you get up?”
 
Good question.  The answer is 4:00 a.m. 

Colin and Michael

On July 2nd, 2009, the StoryCorps Oral History project opened its mobile recording booth at Rundel Library, as part of the City of Rochester’s 175th Anniversary Celebration. For the next month, over two hundred Rochesterians recorded their stories, and we’ve hearing them over the last year during Morning Edition/All Things Considered.

Anthony and Michael Venturo

It’s Thursday, the day we hear stories that were recorded here in Rochester last summer by StoryCorps, the national oral history project. Today we hear from Anthony Venturo and his son Michael. Their visit to the mobile recording booth gave Anthony the chance to about what it was like to grow up during World War Two.

Lydia Timmons and Mary Graupman

When she was just 15 years old, Lydia Timmons left school to go to work full time, because the economic downturn had severely affected her mother and 9 brothers. That was in 1941.