Hard of Hearing

A Sound Experiment

I've never considered myself much of a scientist.

So I consider it a stroke of luck when a grant application calling for a "hypothesis" crossed my desk -- just one day after I helped my daughter put together a middle school science fair project. I actually knew how to phrase a hypothesis, and WXXI was awarded money to conduct experiments to test my hypothesis.

So what is a broadcast news director doing in the laboratory?

Access to Candidates information

Hello;

I agree with Bob in saying that if it (TV ads or Website video Blurb) is not captioned it is a slap in our faces. I have been following this problem for several years and I remember those who do caption their TV ads or Website Video Blurb when we go to the voting booths.

What I cannot track is what is broad casted on the radio because they are not captioned, but they do carry (repeat) it on the websites. I wish the radio stations would post the text of what was broad casted. Some do and others do not. Granted this is not the issue with the candidates as much as the Broadcasters. If it were posted in TEXT then I would be able to read what the candidates said over the airwaves. This is also true for the video broadcaster (Local and National News).

Captioning and the Election

Candidates running for public office should be aware of the importance of captioning any material that they put on TV or on Video. There are 90,000 deaf and hard of hearing people in Monroe County and we vote. However, when a candidate does not even bother to caption their commercials or other audio-visual material it sends a negative message to us that the candidate is both insensitive to our needs and does not care.

All candidates, no matter what office they are running for should caption whatever they put on TV or on their personal web site with videos. Hillary Clinton has been very good at doing that and we appreciate these efforts, to do otherwise is a slap in the face to the deaf and hard of hearing community in Monroe County.

Introduction

I was asked to comment on access to our candidates specifically to their websites. For several weeks I have been browsing their websites. My specific area of interest lies with Captions as I am Deaf.

In general the websites are interesting and sometimes I wish there was more. For example and this applies to all of them thus far, There is a button to change to Espanol and none to add Captions. It is easy to add a button that would be more accessible rather than searching for it. I have not easily been able to find Video with Captions on any of the websites. I have received Links to those that are captioned and they are at their websites.

I will be reviewing one candidate at a time and commenting on their own websites and links.

Using Your Civic Sense

Whether Barack Obama wins the Presidency or not, he has already made history.

On February 10th of 2007, Barack Obama announced his campaign for the Presidency. He was speaking before a crowd in Springfield, Illinois. But thanks to 21st Century technology, the entire nation can watch the full speech - unfiltered by the news media or pundits - simply by logging on to Obama's Web site. This includes citizens who are deaf and hard-of-hearing, since the speech is closed-captioned.

Obama was the first Presidential candidate to caption videos on his Web site.