RPO

Ode to Joy

Over the first weekend of October, nearly 8,000 people experienced Beethoven's "Ode to Joy" performed by the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra and Rochester Oratorio Society in the newly-renovated Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre. One patron blogged about what she saw and heard, and she inspired me to share this clip with you.

Ear to the ground

First of all, Eastman Theatre is a MESS, according to Eastman student and WXXI intern Dylan Smith. He poked his head in the other day, and tipped us off to the fact that the School is posting pictures.  Thanks, Dylan!
 
Workers have less than two months to finish major renovations before the RPO opens the new digs October 8th, 9th, and 10th with a performance of Beethoven’s “Ninth Symphony.” The Rochester Oratorio Society will sing the famous ending (“Ode to Joy.”) Members of the Society got an e-mail this week announcing the group has been asked to sing Verdi’s “Requiem” next May with the RPO. This is a significant change. The orchestra’s current schedule lists Verdi's “Aida” in concert May 20th and 22th. So now, as it stands, ROS will bookend the season of Philharmonic concerts. 

Skitty in the Garden of Eden

After a long hiatus, I'm back, writing about music and arts in Rochester, New York.

The big excitement in my life is the prospect of seeing Christopher Seaman conduct Haydn's Creation this weekend.

It's an oratorio telling the biblical story of the creation of the world, the animals, and Adam and Eve, who promptly fall in love and avoid the snakes.  Splendid!   Someone who heard the first performance in 1798 wrote in a letter to the editor of a Vienna newspaper,

"Already three days have passed since that happy evening, and it still sounds in my ears and heart, and my breast is constricted by many emotions even thinking of it."

Click here for a fun conversation with Christopher about Haydn's Creation.  http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/wxxi/.jukebox?action=viewP...

Coinidentally, the big Rochester garden show opened last weekend with a Garden of Eden theme. I missed it, but eyewitnesses reported fewer blooms than usual and lots of snakes.

Christopher Seaman will conduct the Eastman-Rochester Chorus, Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra and soprano Barbara Shirvis, tenor Michael Colvin, and baritone Stephen Powell.    WXXI-FM will broadcast/stream the concert on Classical 91.5, 90.3 and wxxi.org on Wednesday, June 10th at 8:00 p.m.

OK, I'll quit being so serious all the time

If any orchestra wants to play this on their next season, I'll arrange it for them.  RPO, I'm looking at you.

The Los Angeles Guitar Quartet was in the house, and boy can they play!

The LAGQ came to town for multiple concerts, both with your RPO and without, and master classes at the Eastman School of Music.  Much to our surprise and pleasure, they agreed to appear on Backstage Pass.  We got ready.

When music is work

Aaron Copland's book "What to Listen for in Music" invites music fans of all types to consider listening to music on multiple levels and multiple planes.  Last weekend at a concert, I caught myself listening on just one level, and it got me thinking how others listen.

What's wrong with clapping?

 A recent concert-going experience caused a mix of emotion for me: pleasure, frustration, and ultimately boredom.  It then forced me to ask the question: what's wrong with clapping between movements at a classical music concert?

Behind the Scenes, or, When Nobody's Looking

 Ah the joys and perils of combining solitary evenings, a dumb sense of humor, and working in sound-proof rooms.

Jane Austen takes Eastman Theatre

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single novel in possession of a large readership must be in want of a musical adaptation. However little known the feelings or views of the author, this truth is so well fixed in the minds of lyricists, composers, and filmmakers, that it is considered the rightful property of some one or other of their agents. Last night, about 3,000 Rochesterians attended a concert performance of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. I was among them, and I’m happy to report that the musical achieves the dynamism of the book. The pace and the singing were most excellent.   

The show’s greatest strength is in the lyrical, often operatic writing and well-crafted orchestration. What might be saccharine brushes tenderness, especially in duets and ensemble pieces. (For the truth of every thing here related, I can appeal to the testimony of RPO President Charlie Owens, who, during intermission, expressed his admiration for the deft orchestration.)